Blogging is hard! (h/t Will Ferrell)

Clearly, I have not yet found a way to make it dovetail with my everyday academic practices.

It can’t be a “make-work” addition to the endless string of tasks that I (or any of my colleagues in higher education) already face. Further, for me, it can’t merely be about maintaining a “web presence,” one new dimension of the ever-expanding set of demands made upon the time of academic laborers.

My thought right now is that the best answer to this question about how to make blogging “work,” in multiple (and critical) senses, might be that it’s a way of practicing the act of letting words go–and the vulnerability that inevitably attaches itself to that act. It’s no new insight that the written word is not a sovereign construct. And yet.

And yet, one speaks even in one’s silence. The particular configuration of forces constituting that silent/speech is ever in flux, and is rarely held accountable to itself.

So, I can speak or not speak, write or not write, blog or not blog–but that “choice” between paths of action isn’t actually the salient problem. Rather, it is one of understanding where my agency to be heard, to “participate” (if I can use that loaded term) in the give-and-take of public discourse, comes from. This blog has always been part of a struggle to understand and test that agency. I will continue to struggle, even if the results are pretty embarrassingly sporadic.

At least I’m not presidenting, which I’ve heard is a quite complicated scene of sovereignty/management of agency as well.

ETA: the previous link gives the actual origin of “presidenting,” but it’s not that funny to read a transcript. This is much more satisfying.